Should you let your whiskey breathe?

We have all gone back to a bottle at some point and thought that it was noticeably better after we let the whiskey breathe. Knob Creek private barrel picks are known for needing a little bit of time for the whiskey to breathe. When you first open them, they can be harsh and tough to enjoy, but with a little time they sweeten up and give us the flavor we love.



So, what do you have to do to let your bourbon open up?  Drink some, cork the bottle and let it sit. 

Unlike wine, bourbon doesn’t get better with time inside the sealed bottle. You get what you get when you open the bottle, until you introduce another element, like oxygen. Some bottles get much better after letting the whiskey breathe, while others don’t fare so well.

There are only a handful of people on God’s green earth who like Smooth Ambler more than we do, so it’s tough to say what we’re about to say here.  Smwhiskey breatheooth Ambler Old Scout Single Barrel gets worse the longer it sits.  Yes, this is an opinion and every bottle is going to act a little differently when exposed to the elements. But we have multiple bottles we (and others) have absolutely loved shortly after opening that sat open for 6-12 months and now are not very good. We kept going back to these open bottles and were less than impressed time and time again.  We weren’t intending to let this whiskey breathe, we were just taking our sweet time drinking it and sadly, multiple of our Smooth Ambler bottles have lost their gusto.  

We realize these are fighting words and it’s tough for us to say such things about our beloved Smooth Ambler.

Keep in mind, this bourbon made our “Better than Pappy” list.  (Click Here to Read)

Can anyone else relate with us here, or are we taking crazy pills? We should say that even if we are correct, this isn’t the worst thing in the world – It just means you need to have a few friends over and drink your bourbon! 

For anyone wondering, our bottles are always stored upright in an AC controlled room out of sunlight.

Should you let your whiskey breathe?